Perfection is the Enemy of _________.

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“Perfection is the enemy of growth,”  wrote Brene Brown
“Perfection is the enemy of progress,” wrote Winston Churchill.

Others have said perfection is the enemy of done, finished, joy, presence, delight, profitability, excellence, happiness, productivity, and of creativity.

As writer Elizabeth Gilbert said in an interview, “Perfection is a serial killer.”

Perfectionism - the act or  habit of demanding perfection-  is sneaky and seductive. It says it is trying to help us become our best, but blocks our genius by telling us mistakes are a problem rather than a chance to grow.

Perfectionism says you can be happy when everything is done and done perfectly.  That time never comes.

I see perfectionism’s seductive and deadening impact in myself and in my clients and friends. Unless we transform it, perfectionism will keep us away from what we most want - and need- to create and accomplish and contribute in the world.

My favorite tips for transforming perfectionism so you can become your true genius self:

  • Notice with a sense of humor and kindness when perfectionism pops up. No need to become its slave.
  • Fall in love with the process of whatever you are doing and creating, not the need to create a perfect outcome.
  • Focus on growing and learning and getting better and better.
  • Choose which projects, tasks and endeavors matter enough to you to make them great and when good enough is just fine.
  • Upgrade from perfectionism to exceptionalism. To become exceptional at anything you must give yourself the freedom to experiment, to explore and to make mistakes.  
  • Let yourself find happiness in the whacky and weird perfection of this day, this life… as it is.
  • Be kind with yourself and the world. Each of us is perfectly imperfect, each of us is growing into our fullness.

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Want my support in getting clear on what really matters to you,  finding happiness in the midst of imperfection or on your next steps in transforming perfectionism to exceptionalism? Send me an email (Lea@LeaBayles.com) with Let's Talk in the subject line. I'd love to talk with you.